Click Vertical !!

If there is any suggestion that I give to people other than using the exposure compensation, it is this.

I am a big proponent of the idea of clicking vertical images. It is the need for a lot of compositions. Take a look at the following two sets of images where vertical makes so much more sense than the standard horizontal orientation.

_C2X0002 laggar 2

If you are someone who is just starting to warm up to photography, I suggest you go through your entire portfolio and come up with an approximate number for the amount of images that are vertical. I am sure that for most of you this figure will not be greater than 20%. 

One of the reasons for this is that the desktop/laptop monitors where we see our images mostly are all of the landscape orientation. This sub-consciously effects our decision while composing.

The thought that you should have while clicking an image should be based not solely on the media that it will be printed in but also on the entire scene itself.

As evident in the images above, some images do render themselves better in the portrait orientation.

As a rule of thumb, following are some scenarios where a vertical image generally makes a better impact

  1. Whenever you want to show depth
      1. Depth in a landscape for e.g. endless mountains or a road leading into the mountains
      2. Depth in a wildlife image with the subject placed low in the frame 
  2. Whenever your subject is more vertical in its disposition
      1. A single stalk of flower
      2. A vertically perched bird
  3. The obvious portrait images that could adorn the face of a magazine
  4. When the image has more vertical leading lines than horizontal

Over the course of the past few years, I have found that one of the reasons why we don’t click as many vertical images as we should, is that the camera isn’t really designed for it. Try going for a vertical click, it is an awkward positioning of your hand isnt it?

To counter that, there is a very simple device available, it is called the ‘Vertical Grip’ of ‘Battery Grip’.

Here is an image of the Vertical grip. It gives you an extra Shutter Release button and an extra wheel for changing the aperture/shutter values along with all the other controls like changing focus points etc.

vgr

In addition, it also acts as a battery hold. It can take 2 batteries instead of one and gives that much more time in the field without having to worry about the battery.

vert

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This entry was posted in Basics of Photography, Tutorials, Uncategorized.

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